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Gene’s home town is Pampanga which is considered to be the first Spanish province in the Philippines and takes its name from the Spanish word pampang meaning riverbank. The region often gets called the culinary capital of the Philippines because during colonial times the Spaniards trained Filipino cooks in their food customs and cooking techniques including rich, meat stews like Menudo.

Time: 30 mins (prep), 40 minutes + 2-3 hours for the oxtail (cook)

Serves: 4-6

Equipment: 1x chopping board, 1x tongs, 1x sauce pan , 1x plate or lid, 1x chef's knife, 1x pairing knife, 1x high-sided frying pan/wok, 1x frying pan, 1x serving spoon, 1x wooden spoon, 1x ladle

Ingredients

  • 1½ kg oxtail, (preferably skin on)
  • 25g butter
  • 30ml olive oil
  • 3 cloves garlic
  • 20g onion
  • 30g red pepper
  • 1x green pepper
  • ½ tsp paprika picante (dark smoky Spanish paprika)
  • ½ cup ham, cubed
  • ½ cup sliced chorizo Bilbao (Spanish sausage)
  • 1 cup tomato sauce
  • 1 tbsp tomato paste
  • 1 tbsp cooked garbanzos (chickpeas peeled)
  • 2 tbsp Spanish brandy or red wine

Method

Step 1

The first step is to roast our peppers. Place the pepper onto your open flame and allow it to char and turn black.

Step 2


Peel your chickpeas removing the thin skin. Check your pepper once more - turning when you need to.

Step 3

Slice your chorizo on an angle. Crush a bulb of garlic and remove 3 cloves. By now our pepper should be blackened, if so, remove from the heat into a covered container (I use a sauce pan).

Step 4

Peel the cloves of garlic and then finely slice them. Scrape away the skins from the pepper and then cut in half and de-seed. Clean your board.

Step 5

Peel the shallots and then add some olive oil to your pan along with a good spoon of butter. Add the shallots and garlic and then your chorizo.

Step 6

Allow everything to cook and colour nicely before adding the peppers and the oxtail. Add the smoked paprika and mix everything well. Add the tomato paste, mixing well again and then add the tomato sauce.

Step 7

Add the shelled chickpeas, mix well and then spoon in some of the oxtail cooking liquor and then simmer until it thickens and the oxtail is incredibly tender. Create a roux, cooking out the flour and then add it to our stew - this will thicken it up further.

Step 8

Serve family style and enjoy!


Gene's Notes

Step 1

This recipe comes from my home town which was the centre of sugar trade in the Philippines. It’s very similar to New Orleans in the USA.

Don’t worry if your oxtail has been de-skinned.

Make sure to keep the pepper turning as you char.

Step 2

Removing the skin of the chickpea can make it nicer to eat.

Step 3

Placing the pepper into a covered container will cause it to sweat and soften further. This will make our skin much easier to rub off.

Source a good quality chickpea - the smaller the better.

Step 4

To peel the pepper use a jay-cloth or the back of your knife.

Step 5

I've used a pressure cooker to cook my oxtail but feel free to braise it in your oven with a mixture of carrots, celery and onion with some stock. It should take roughly 2-3 hours for it to be tender.

Keep the cooking liquid.

The oil and butter together will add lots of flavour. The oil will also prevent the butter from burning too quickly.

Step 6

Every time we add a new ingredient in, ensure you mix it well, getting all the flavours combined and mixing together (this will help us develop all the flavours).

Step 7

This is a grand stew, which we want to be able to eat with a fork alone, so the vegetables and meat need to be incredibly tender. The collagen and gelatin will thicken our dish, along with our roux.

Step 8

This is the stew from my town and it's super delicious.

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Gene Gonzalez
I'm here to share my love for Filipino food with the world. I'm also the founder and president of the Center for Asian Culinary Studies.